The New Abnormal

The 44 men elected to serve as chief executive officer of the United States are a bit of a mixed bag.* They range from superlative statesmen (Lincoln, FDR) to mumping mediocrities (Pierce, Dubya), from embodiments of national aspiration (Reagan, Obama) to symbols of national damnation (Hoover, Nixon).  They’ve included everything from paragons of public probity (Washington) to dolly-pronging cad lads congenitally incapable of keeping their plonkers holstered (Clinton, Harding, JFK).

Yet despite all the differences of party, policy, and personal peculiarity, all presidents have, at least until this point, shared a certain a certain deference to the office they occupied. This included respecting the institutional niceties, genuflecting before democratic norms, and generally at least trying to act like they were serious adults doing a serious job. And even if they weren’t serious adults, they at least tried to keep whatever sordid, sleazy, stupid, criminal, or bat shit crazy shenanigans they were up to behind the Oval Office’s tightly drawn curtains.

Then we got Donald J. Trump. He not only gleefully waggles his non compos mentis in front of open windows, he gooses it nekkid across the White House lawn. Just a few months into his administration and the standard norms of the presidency are being abandoned faster than an inconvenient campaign pledge. Trump is giving us a new normal for the presidency, or perhaps more accurately a new abnormal.

A recap of recent events: Trump fired the head of FBI saying it was on the recommendation of the Department of Justice. Then he basically admitted it was because of an FBI investigation into his campaign’s Russia ties. Then he tweeted veiled threats to the agency head he just canned. Then he owned to passing on classified information to a government hostile to the interests of the United States—and doing it in the Oval Office, no less. He also claimed to have invented the phrase “priming the pump” (we’re still trying to get economists jaws off the ground), and told Time he gets two scoops of ice cream while everyone else at the White House table gets one.

Now, in and of itself, nothing in the previous paragraph marks Trump as a particularly precedent-busting president. Plenty of his predecessors racked up impressive records of scandal, silliness, and engaged in stuff that was weird or creepy. Nixon started firing people when they got too close to the truth of Watergate. Reagan had a guy selling missiles to Iran out of the White House basement. Jimmy Carter said he was attacked by a vicious rabbit (seriously). Lyndon Johnson was notorious for—and I’m being quite literal here—willy waving. Johnson called his johnson “jumbo”, which might explain why so many people thought LBJ was such a dick. And, BTW, sorry for phallic theme that seems to be developing here, but it’s sort of inevitable given that the voters keep limiting this club to Y-chromosome carriers. Boys and their toys and all that.

What makes Trump such a harbinger of the new abnormal is not necessarily what he’s done, but how much of it he’s managed to cram into so short a period of time. What makes that paragraph above so cosmically gobsmacking is not that it packs in enough scandal and impropriety, fib and fabrication, and kook and crazy to leave lasting marks on a presidential legacy. It would certainly do that if it was spread out over four-year administration. What marks Trump as different is that all came out within the past twelve days. It’s kind of hard to process. Minds more agile than mine are working overtime to keep pace with the boggle.

And that’s just some of the most recent stuff. The scandals, misfires, gaffes, blunders and general epic levels of ineptness are multiplying faster than Jimmy Carter’s rabbits. Last week The New York Times editorial board put out a list of mortifying presidential precedents Trump has set, which include attacking private citizens on social media, charging an immediate predecessor with criminal activity without providing any evidence, intimidating congressional witnesses, undermining the legitimacy of the judiciary, refusing to release tax returns, engaging in bald ass nepotism, and going golfing most weekends at a staggering cost to the taxpayer. The Times’ list was extensive, but mostly notable for two things. First, it was representative not comprehensive, in other words it left out a lot. Second, the Times’ felt compelled to update it only 48-hours after publishing it because, well, that’s plenty of time for the Trump administration to produce another three or four solid claimants to any catalog of presidential shame.

I know how the Times op-ed scribes feel. In the hour since I started writing this—I completely kid you not—another scandal hit. This was the one about Trump asking the FBI director not to investigate Mike Flynn, the national security adviser pink slipped for fibbing about his contacts with Russian officials. By the time I post this I wouldn’t be surprised if that was old news, a distant three-scandals-ago-memory languishing in the outer reaches of our twitter feeds. To heck with it, though, I’m not even going to try and stay current with the expeditiously moving target of Trump administration peccadillos. I can’t keep up and tallying the crises (plural) de jour isn’t the point.

The point is that in just a few months Trump has sullied the presidency in ways that it took his most nefarious predecessors’ years of dedicated skullduggery to equal. He has literally managed to set the bar so low for presidential behavior that making it through 24-hours without a major shite cyclone is now considered a political win by legislators in his own party. Here’s a selection of quotes from GOP senators made in the past few days: the White house is “in a downward spiral”; Trumps tweets “take us off in a ditch”; the scandals are “Watergate size”; “we could do with a little less drama from the White House; and, my favorite, “can we have a crisis free day? That’s all I’m asking” (respectively Bob Corker, Lindsey Graham, Mitch McConnell, John McCain and Susan Collins).

Again, that’s just the Republicans we’re talking about. The Dems are past tut-tuts and disapproving harumphs and ready to get their impeachment on. That it got to this point in less than four months—four freakin’ months—shows just how removed from normal the Trump administration is. Now in fairness, Trump was not elected to be normal, to carry on with politics as usual. But jeez, I don’t think any serious grownup contemplated this. This is less about draining a swamp than sinking into one.

I suppose, though, we all better get used to it. It’s the new abnormal.

*Little known fact: though Trump is officially the 45th president, only 44 dudes have actually had the full Hail to the Chief treatment. Grover Cleveland won election to non-consecutive terms and was technically the 22nd and the 24th president.

 

 

 

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